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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
people sort of live those years? >> absolutely. medical science has been so great. you mentioned novartis earlier. they're on the cutting edge of figuring out therapies that will work for people like me. so, for example, in my treatment, the first medicine i took called. >> glivac wasn't working the way i wanted it to. i changed to the next generation drug and it worked very well. it has given me what is called the molecular response, which means i no longer have any bad white blood cells that can be detected in my body down to the molecular level. that's the type of response that we want to reach and hope to maintain. >> you know in the three years since being diagnosed, what has been your biggest breakthrough personally or with respect to treatment? and how the treatments happened. >> i think personally once people found out i had leukemia, it made me a lot more human to people. when you're a successful athlete, people think you can do anything at anytime. and when they find out you're susceptible to the same things that every other ordinary person is susceptible to, it kind of humanize
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
could lose their jobs and science and public research grants could be cut including in to cancer and childhood diseases. fewer americans could receive drug abuse treatment and $700 million slashed from the epa budget. cutting back of food inspection. disaster relief, omb says, quote, the federal emergency management administration's ability to respond would be undermined. and finally, from border patrol to hiring new fbi agents, correction officers, federal prosecutors, all could be scaled back. now, all of these cuts, brooke, don't happen exactly at 12:01 a.m. on january 2nd. they happen over the course of a year. but agencies are preparing for an impasse in washington. this is exactly, exactly what policymakers are trying to avoid. brooke? >> thank you. >>> shock waves in washington today. powerful republican senator calling it quits. south carolina's senator jim demint will be stepping down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. that's a powerful conservative think tank in d.c. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate h
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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